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Ancient greece dating

First of all, it could explain a brake in the local dating.There was a continuous year-count from the arrival of Pompey in 64/63 BCE (when ) towards 19 BCE in the time of Augustus.However, Galba became emperor briefly after Nero committed suicide June 9, 68 CE and seven months later Galba already was murdered January 15, it is assumed 29 August was the starting date of the Alexandrian New Year, and 30 August every 4 years.It means the reign of Galba in the first Alexandrian year lasted only from June 9 to August 29, close to 3 months, while year 2 lasted from August 29 to January 15, about 4.5 months.For somebody born 31 January 1980, for example, the first year runs form 31 January 1980 to 30 January 1981.This start with a first full year is however not the rule in ancient year dating on coins, what may generate a lot of confusion.As both the years 1 and 2 appear frequently in the market, a starting date comparable to the Alexandrian area is likely. While religious calendars tend to start in spring, the influential Macedonian court preferred the late summer/autumn as the start, a system used as well in the region.A second clear example of the short regnal years from the region is countermarks on SC-coins from Antioch of Augustus and Tiberius, attributed to Caligula (37-41 CE).

People today count their own age with full years only, starting at the event of their birth.

In this article, a solution is proposed to offer a coherent and consistent year dating for the coins of Roman Antioch.

There are several sources for confusion when interpreting ancient year counts.

This fit suggests the new year 2 of the Caesarean era starting at the end of summer in or around August.

In this case, a start early August would offer a good start as will be shown.

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Ancient greece dating introduction

Ancient greece dating